How to Build the Hanging Gardens of Babylon at Your Home

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, a terraced garden with splendid plants and beautiful fountains, symbolizes love and shows how strong the love of Nebuchadnezzar II (the king of Babylon) to his wife, Amytis. It’s unique and attractive with flourishing flowers and lush plants on desert place. A desert place? It seems impossible to grow plants on that kind of area. We need a great supply of water to make an oasis through desert. How can it be?

This man-made oasis can be built with certain technique which nowadays we commonly call it as hydroponic system. Through this technique, the beauty of The Hanging Gardens of Babylon is possible to discover at home. The good news is you don’t have to be as rich as king Nebuchadnezzar II to build such miniature of the hanging gardens Babylon. It just needs your creative idea and patience in the process.

What to do to have your own gardening home?

1. Make estimation how large your garden will be. If you prefer small garden, then it’s your choice. No matter of the size, the point is the garden will beautify your home.
2. Prepare a Styrofoam and cut it one inch less than the width and the length of container
3. Make approximately two or three holes to hold the plastic cups and make sure the bottom of cup at one half inch longer than the Styrofoam
4. Poke holes into the underneath of the cups to support growth of the roots
5. Add growing media into the cups until three quarters full.
6. Fill container with water
7. Put Styrofoam with the cups into container and it will be floating on water
8. The seeds on the cups are ready to grow

We need time to grow plants, when they are going to blossom or bear fruit. Their beauty and attraction will radiance into home. An eye-catching design of garden can be enhanced into advanced step by asking professional advice. You may need it when you think that it is time for you to follow the footsteps of king Nebuchadnezzar II in Babylon.

Secondary Markets Building a Unique Investment Landscape

Owing to different market conditions, more and more investors are embracing commercial real estate’s secondary markets.

But what are the existing market conditions? And how are they influencing today’s investors to make the shift to these markets for expanding their commercial real estate portfolio?

Understanding the present market conditions

Commercial real estate has secondary markets that are characterized by:

The potential for having stable national economic trends
The improved risk-taking ability of buyers
A yawning difference in yields across secondary and primary marketplaces

These factors are driving investors to set their sights on secondary markets for improving their returns.

Decoding real estate secondary markets

As the name suggests, these markets acquire the second spot in the hierarchy of making commercial realty investments.

But secondary markets bring in unique opportunities and risks.

The assumptions supporting the commercial real estate investment strategy in the coasts may not hold water for lenders who are operating in the areas with lower liquidity. That means one thing: secondary marketplaces may not be the most ideal business when done on a smaller scale.

The thing is that the difference between secondary and primary markets extends way beyond a simple tally of every area’s commercial real estate. And if someone is foraying into the world of such markets for the first time, they will not be able to make sense of different market participants, different properties, and links to the real economy.

Speaking of their issues, these markets present unique roadblocks related to property acquisitions, investors’ dispositions, and fund availability. (Generally, investors may face a tough time finding the right financing opportunities for initiating buying activities in secondary markets.)

Long-term prospects in secondary markets

Most investors are propelled toward these markets for commercial real estate.
Why?

Mostly, investors are motivated by a secondary market’s prospects for appreciation in the long run.

It is because some markets give high gains, provided that they meet some criteria.
For example, some markets may have a high concentration of skilled workers along with an exceptional track record of innovation. These markets rank at the top spot of the list of lucrative markets. Other than that, some supply-constrained markets can also provide high yields.

But just because a skilled workforce is driving long-term growth initiatives in any marketplace does not necessarily make it any less volatile. Ranging from the time of investment to asset selection, these marketplaces too have multiple factors that govern their liquidity models.

Like any other market, a secondary market will have its own unique risks as well. The investors who want to expand their portfolio by speculating in these markets have to factor in a variety of aspects.

First of all, they’ll have to consider the fact that the global economy is expanding and having an impact on the economies of different countries. Because of its synergic effects, the global economy is pushing itself away from financial crises at a steady pace.

On successfully analyzing these factors, investors must integrate their analyses into decoding how and when these external influencers will change a market’s performance patterns and risk-return tradeoffs.

Successfully analyzing the current economic landscape and its impact on secondary markets will drive policymakers, investors, and lenders in the right direction.

MoS2 Low Friction Coatings – Not Just For The Aviation Industry Anymore

MoS2 low friction coatings (also known as molybdenum disulfide, also spelled, disulphide) are regarded the most widely used form of solid film lubrication today. What makes them unique (with the other dichalcogenides) is the weak atomic interaction (Van der Waals) of the sulfide anions, while covalent bonds within molybdenum are strong.Thus, lubrication relies on slippage along the sulfur atoms. All the properties of the lamella structure are intrinsic. No external form of moisture is required. In fact, best performance from MoS2 low friction coatings is attained in the absence of water vapor, which are prone to surface adsorption. This makes them ideal under vacuum.There are a number of methods to apply MoS2 low friction coatings, including a simple rubbing or burnishing, air-spraying resin-bonded or inorganically bonded coatings, and more recently by sputtering through physical vapor deposition (PVD).Thickness will vary, depending on form of MoS2 low friction coatings, but typically ranges between 5 to 15 micrometer. Sputtering techniques can produce thin films of 0.2 micrometer. While plasma sprays will result in higher builds, beginning at 0.003 inch or more.Friction coefficient less than 0.05 is attainable, but will also vary with humidity and sliding conditions. Tests show friction decreases with increasing vacuum strength. Friction also lowers with higher load, faster surface speed, or both. In fact, MoS2 low friction coatings are superior to both graphite and tungsten disulfide (WS2). Friction with MoS2 low friction coatings is independent of particle size, though the larger particles can carry more load.Dry lubrication for MoS2 low friction coatings remains superior at higher temperatures, with oxidation rates remaining relatively low at temperatures up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit. And in dry, oxygen-free atmospheres, lubricating performance, even with oxidation products, is stable to 1300 degrees Fahrenheit.Higher air flow can affect oxidation kinetic rates in atmosphere. Molybdenum oxide products (MoO3) and sulfur dioxide. Since MoO3 alone offers dry lubrication, based on its relative softness, molybdenum disulfide coating are ideal in higher temperature environments. At higher temperatures, though, they are better suited under vacuum. In atmosphere, they are prone to water adsorption from air based on their hygroscopic properties.As with the other dry film lubricants, while differences may prove negligible, you will have to determine which is better for you: longer wear life or better performance, using MoS2 low friction coatings. Generally, friction will be slightly higher by coating both surfaces, rather than coating one surface only. But wear life will increase coating both surfaces.Friction can be good in so many areas of life. Without it we could not easily stop and start our motion, or change direction. But in moving machinery, friction causes considerable loss of energy, poorer performance, not to mention limiting wear life.As with many non-lubricated systems, the static coefficient of friction is higher than the dynamic coefficient of friction. The resultant motion is often referred to as ‘stick-slip’. Basically, the two surfaces stick together until the elastic energy within the system has accumulated to some threshold, where a sudden, forward slip takes place. Under magnification, it’s apparent the union of two surfaces is often limited to intimate contact only at the tips of a few of the asperities (small scale, surface irregularities). At these point areas, pressures relating to contact may be near the hardness of the softer material. Thus, plastic deformation occurs on some localized scale. This is known as cold welding. Where bonded junctions are formed between two materials.For lubrication to occur, these bonds, this adhesive component of friction, must be broken. And this is where products like MoS2 low friction coatings serve well.So, where are these products used today? Consider aerospace, automotive, marine and electronic, for starters. There, you’ll find MoS2 low friction coatings, again and again.